Wednesday 5th June

05-06-2019

Bello Bar
1 Portobello Harbour, D8.

pastevent

The final instalment of the Kaleidoscope 2018/2019 season, the 10th of the 10th season, takes place on June 5th in the series’ canal-side home of Bello Bar. An intriguing all-wind affair, save for one traditional music element, awaits those who are lucky enough to grab a ticket for an event that consistently sells out in advance.


  •  Deirdre O’Leary
  •  Cassiopeia Wind Quintet
  •  Matthew Manning
  •  Caitriona Ryan
  •  Paul Roe
  •  Julie Maisel
  •  Nic Gareiss and Ultan O’Brien
  •  Nic Gareiss and Ultan O’Brien

Music

Nic Gareiss + Ultan O Brien

Michigan-born dancer and musician, Nic Gareiss, has been described by The Irish Times as “the human epitome of the unbearable lightness of being” and by The Boston Herald as “the most inventive and expressive step dancer on the scene.” He draws from many percussive dance traditions to weave together a dance technique facilitating his love of improvisation and musical collaboration. He has performed with many of the luminaries of contemporary traditional music and dance, including The Chieftains, Darol Anger, Bill Frisell, Colin Dunne and Alasdair Fraser, and is a member of the hugely popular quartet, This Is How We Fly. To add to a number of international commissions, residencies and awards, Gariess was recognised, in 2015/2016, by Michigan State Museum’s Michigan Traditional Arts Programme as a Master Traditional Artist.
Ultan O’Brien is a fiddle player and violist from County Clare. A graduate of the DIT Conservatory of Music and the Kodály Institute in Kecskemét, Hungary, he performs and records traditional and contemporary Irish music as a soloist & with a number of groups/ bands including Skipper’s Alley and Aon Teanga:Un Çhengey. Ultan has taught fiddle workshops in Ireland and abroad, most recently in Evanston, Wyoming (March 2016), and in the Camden Irish Centre, London (July, 2015). In 2017, Ultan received a Traditional Arts Bursary Award from the Arts Council of Ireland to spend time focusing on the viola—specifically, its suitability regarding the intricacies and subtleties of traditional music associated with west Clare— and to create new music on the viola that exists in a contemporary context & is grounded in the aesthetic of west Clare fiddle music.


The music of Luigi Zaninelli

At the age of 17, Luigi Zaninelli played his music for renowned composer Gian Carlo Menotti who then accepted him as a student at the Curtis Institute of Music. Two years later the Curtis Institute sent Mr. Zaninelli to study composition with the legendary Rosario Scalero, the teacher of Menotti and Samuel Barber. After a period of composing film music for RCA Victor Italiana, Zaninella later returned to the United States and became Composer-in-Residence and Professor of Music at the University of Southern Mississippi. With over 300 published works to his credit, he has received commissions to compose for virtually all mediums including opera, ballet, chamber music, orchestra, band, chorus, and solo voice. His whimsical “Rome Suite” was written in 1986, for flute, B-flat clarinet, and bassoon and takes form in four movements, a tango, a waltz, a blues and a fox-trot. This work will be performed by flautist Julie Maisel, who wrote her Doctorate of Music on the subject of Zaninelli’s flute music, in the company of clarinetist Paul Roe and bassoonist, John Hearne.


Monster by Ed Bennett

Irish composer Ed Bennett was born in Bangor, Co.Down. His music, which has been described in the press as ‘anarchic’ (Irish Times), ‘manic’ (Classical Music) and ‘thrilling’ (Gramophone) is often characterized by its strong rhythmic energy, extreme contrasts and the combination of acoustic, electronic and multimedia elements; it was recently described in The Guardian as ‘unclassifiable, raw-nerve music of huge energy and imagination’ and by Sinfini Music as ‘one of the most scintillating voices to emerge of late from the British Isles.’ His body of work includes large-scale orchestral works, ensemble pieces, solo works, electronic music, opera, installations and works for dance and film. He is artistic director of the ensemble Decibel and was recently awarded the Leverhulme Prize for Performing Arts. On the occasion of this Kaleidoscope, we hear his 2005 work “Monster”. Scored for bass clarinet and soundtrack, “it was commissioned by Paul Roe for his CD “Between” on Diatribe Records and Paul himself perform the work for the Kaleidoscope audience.


La Cheminée du Roi René by Milhaud

Ireland’s premier wind ensemble make a welcome return to the Kaleidoscope stage with a performance comprising music by Italian composer Giuseppe Cambini (1746-1825) and the intriguing “La cheminée du roi René” by Darius Milhaud. Written in 1939, “The Stroll of King René” is an adaptation of the music that the French composer wrote for Raymond Bernard’s film “Cavalcade d’amour” and was first performed in its wind-quintet/seven-movement form in 1941. Milhaud was a hugely influential composer and teacher of the 20th century, a member of the revolutionary composers collective Les Six, whose compositions are heavily influenced by jazz and polytonality.
Cassiopeia Winds boasts members from the RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra, the RTÉ Concert Orchestra and Crash Ensemble- flautist Catriona Ryan, clarinetist Deirdre O Leary, oboeist Matthew Manning, bassoonist John Hearne and French-horn player Cormac Ó hAodáin. Their repertoire runs the full and varied gamut of the wind canon from 19th century to contemporary works.



Performers

 Cassiopeia Winds

Cassiopeia Winds

Cassiopeia Winds is an Irish chamber wind ensemble formed in 2010, whose performances are marked by vivacity, panache and a dedication to the exploration of fine sound-worlds. Though the ensemble has the capacity to expand or contract to suit its innovative programming, at its core is a quintet of players whose members are among the finest in the country, including players from the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, RTÉ Concert Orchestra and the Crash Ensemble.

The ensemble aims with each performance to run the full and varied gamut of the wind repertoire from 19th-century to contemporary works, including Danzi, Reicha, Barber, Hindemith, Poulenc, Francaix, Ibert, Nielsen, Ligeti and Arvo Part. Their concerts represent the startling originality and exoticism, and the inimitable palette of tone colours of the wind ensemble. They have a dedication to bringing the lesser-known works of this repertoire into the Irish and international concert halls and festivals.

Cassiopeia Winds have performed across the country as well as completing a tour of Dublin churches. They have a passion for collaborating with other artists, such as renowned pianist Finghin Collins with whom they performed the Poulenc Sextet at a concert in Monkstown. The ensemble also have a great interest in contemporary music and in supporting the work of new Irish composers, and intend to commission new works for wind quintet for performance in Ireland and internationally.

Cassiopeia is a constellation in the northern sky, easily recognisable due to its distinctive “W” shape formed by 5 bright stars.


 Nic Gareiss  Ultan O Brien

Nic Gareiss + Ultan O Brien

Fiddler, violist, and composer Ultan O’Brien and percussive dancer Nic Gareiss perform a set of new collaborations exploring space, time and texture in Irish traditional music and percussive dance. Focusing on gestures and sounds that play with expectation, rhythm and time, the duo puckishly explores what fiddle music and step dance can teach us about both predetermined and extemporaneous composition. Ultan and Nic create sound and movement, engaging mimetically: fiddle, fiddler, and fiddling, dance, dancer, and dancing to reimagine the enacted possibilities of these historically symbiotic entities through traditional repertoire and new music+dance collaboration.


 Paul Roe
 Ed Bennett

Ed Bennett

Irish composer Ed Bennett was born in Bangor, Co.Down. His music, which has been described in the press as ‘anarchic’ (Irish Times), ‘manic’ (Classical Music) and ‘thrilling’ (Gramophone) is often characterized by its strong rhythmic energy, extreme contrasts and the combination of acoustic, electronic and multimedia elements; it was recently described in The Guardian as ‘unclassifiable, raw-nerve music of huge energy and imagination’ and by Sinfini Music as ‘one of the most scintillating voices to emerge of late from the British Isles.’ His body of work includes large-scale orchestral works, ensemble pieces, solo works, electronic music, opera, installations and works for dance and film. He is artistic director of the ensemble Decibel and was recently awarded the Leverhulme Prize for Performing Arts.