Wednesday 8th March

08-03-2017

BelloBar
1 Portobello Harbour, Dublin 8.

past event

Kaleidoscope returns to its Portobello residence following its gala 100th performance with a special show for International Women’s Day, on the second Wednesday of March, as opposed to its usual first- Wednesday-of-the-month. The evening offers two short cinematic contributions, one a stunning Clare Langan 2015 piece “The Floating World”, with score by Johann Johannsson, the second a selection of short silent films to be presented with live score by series’ co-curator Lioba Petrie (cello). Music for the evening all stems from the pens of female composers, Clara Schumann, Nadia Boulanger, Rebecca Clarke, Amanda Feery, and more, but equality in the gender-balance of the evening’s line-up of performers will be very much in evidence. This is a night for all, male or female, to recognise a legacy and a future of female art-makers.


  •  Lioba Petrie
  •  Dulciana Choir
  •  Thérèse Fahy
  •  Alex Petcu
  •  Amanda Feery’s Sun Stands Still
  •  Rory Musgrave and Lance Coburn
  •  William Butt
  •  William Butt and Lance Coburn
  •  Lance Coburn


Music

Sechs Lieder, Op. 13 – Clara Schumann

Clara Schumann’s presence in the history of European music has become firmly fixed in recent years: the many new biographies, editions, recordings and performances of her compositions testimony to her significance and influence. Her songs, not as well known as her works for piano, are among the treasures of her creative work and can take their place with the best of the German Lieder repertoire.
Except for Walzer, all Clara Schumann’s songs published during her lifetime were written after her marriage to Robert Schumann and almost every song was intended as a Christmas or birthday gift for her husband.
She generally chose to set poems exploring the themes beloved by the German romantics: the beauties of nature, love, yearning, unrest, melancholy, foreboding, separation, mystery and death. She set verses of such contemporaries as Emanuel Geibel, Heinrich Heine, and Friedrich Rückert among others.


Three Pieces – Nadia Boulanger

Nadia Boulanger (1887-1979) was born in Paris. Her father was the composer Ernest Boulanger who was also a professor of voice at the Paris Conservatory. She herself studied at the Conservatory distinguishing herself and winning several prizes in composition. Although she pursued a career as a composer, conductor and performer, she is remembered today as one of the most influential composition teachers of the 20th century. She compositions were influenced by Faure, Debussy and to some extent Ravel.
Her Three Pieces, originally for organ, were transcribed by Boulanger for Cello and Piano date from 1914 and perhaps can be described as post impressionist. The opening piece is a delicate, mysterious Moderato. The middle work, Sas vitesse et l’aise, resembles a peaceful lament, while the finale, Vite et nerveusement, is an edgy almost frentic affair resembling the hurly burly of modern life.


Lioba Petrie

Original score composed and performed by Lioba Petrie


Sun Stands Still – Amanda Feery

Amanda Feery is an Irish composer currently based in the U.S., where she is completing a PhD in Composition at Princeton University. She graduated from Trinity College Dublin, having completed a B.A. in Music in 2006, and an M.Phil in Music and Media Technologies in 2009.

Past collaborators include Crash Ensemble, Fidelio Trio, ConTempo Quartet, Orkest de Ereprijs, Lisa Moore, Cora-Venus Lunny, Michelle O’Rourke, Zoe Conway, and Paul Roe. She has participated as a composer fellow at Ostrava Days Festival (Czech Republic), Soundscape Festival (Italy), Bang on a Can Summer Festival (U.S), and the International Young Composers Meeting (Netherlands). She was winner of the West Cork Chamber Music Composer Award in 2009, and the Jerome Hynes Award in 2013.

Current and future projects include a large-scale multimedia work for vocal quartet and So Percussion, and commissions from Ensemble Mise-en, Bearthoven, Jacquin Trio, and cellist Amanda Gookin.





Performers

 William Butt

William Butt

William Butt was born in London. His musical career started early, as a chorister in St. Georges Chapel, Windsor. Later he studied at the Royal Northern College of Music with Moray Welsh, and after winning awards and scholarships such as the Royal Society of Arts, Martin Trust and first prize in the Muriel Taylor competition, he furthered his studies with Antonio Lysy in Montreal. He now enjoys a busy career as soloist, chamber musician and is professor of cello at the Royal Irish Academy of Music in Dublin. On the concert platform he has performed extensively throughout Ireland, the UK, Europe and the Far East. His performances have been broadcast on BBC radio 3 (in recital as well as concerti with the Ulster Orchestra), BBC radio Ulster, BBC world service, national television in China, CBC (Canada) and RTÉ radio and television. His recordings of the solo cello suites of Benjamin Britten and J.S. Bach on the Warner Classics label have been widely lauded.


 Lioba Petrie

Lioba Petrie

Dublin born cellist Lioba Petrie studied in Dublin’s Conservatory of Music and Drama, graduating in 2000 with a diploma in instrumental teaching and then graduating from NUI Maynooth with a BA mus in 2001.
Lioba is passionate about chamber music and is a member of the Astral string quartet.
Over the last four years, Lioba has enjoyed composing and performing music for theatre, in particular Nick Lee’s “Luca and the sunshine” as part of Dublin Fringe festival and also “The Messenger” with London based Limbik Theatre company.
For 11 years Lioba was a member of 3epkano with whom she wrote, composed and recorded film scores for old silent movies and modern film. As part of this ensemble Lioba performed at major arts festivals all over Ireland as well as BAM film festival and at the Lincoln Centre in New York and the National Gallery in Washington D.C. Lioba continues her work with film in a solo capacity and with new ensemble Unshaped Form.
In September 2015, Lioba enjoyed an artist’s residency at the Centre Culturel Irlandais, (Paris) where she was commissioned to compose and then perform a new score to Chris Marker’s film “La Jetee” (1967).
As well as working as a freelance musician, Lioba took over the co-management and curation of the popular Kaleidoscope Night concert series in January 2014. Lioba teaches privately and holds teaching positions in the Rathdown Music centre and at Clongowes Wood College and is Co- Director and founder of Spike -Dublin Alternative Cello Fest .


 Rory Musgrave

Rory Musgrave

Rory Musgrave (baritone). Also a recent graduate with a masters degree in performance from the Royal Irish Academy of Music, Rory has been engaged by Opera Theatre Company, NI Opera, Ulysses Opera Company, Irish Youth Opera and Wide Open Opera.


 Dulciana

Dulciana

Dulciana is a female-voice choir based in Dublin, directed by Eoghan Desmond.
Eoghan is the founder and director of Dulciana upper voices choir, who are committed to bringing performances of music by female composers to the Irish public.


 Thérèse Fahy

Thérèse Fahy

Dublin-born Thérèse Fahy, one of Ireland’s foremost pianists, enjoys an active performing and teaching career at home and abroad. Her regular recital and concerto appearances throughout Europe and the United States have met with critical acclaim, as have her numerous broadcasts for both RTÉ and BBC. In recent seasons, Thérèse has toured the east coast of the United States, 2011 with a recital-programme of solo Irish contemporary piano music supported by Culture Ireland and the Fulbright Commission, and in 2012 with performances of the 24 Debussy Preludes, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the composer’s birth.A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, a Fulbright scholar and a French Government scholar, Thérèse Fahy is a senior professor of the piano faculty of the Royal Irish Academy of Music.


 Lance Colburn

Lance Colburn

…one sat awe-inspired in amazement, wondering how it could possibly be played any better…” is how the Kölnische Rundschau described Lance Coburn’s performance of Prokofiev’s 3rd Piano Concerto. Since winning first prize at the Tomassoni International Piano Competition, Cologne in 2001, Lance has performed in Austria, Germany, Italy, Greece, Israel, Russia, United States, Ireland, South Africa, Australia and Korea as both concerto soloist and recitalist.
He has performed with the Central Florida , the Israel and Sydney Symphony Orchestras, the RTE National Symphony and Hibernian Orchestras in Dublin, and most other Australian Orchestras. With the WDR – Cologne Orchestra, one critic described his performance of Beethoven’s “Emperor” concerto thus: “Coburn approached the grandiose work….with the vigour of a classically-inspired artist”.
In the Bonn International Beethoven Festival, critics described his five-sonata recital as – “refreshing….uncompromising….unacademic….” In the Accademia Filharmonica Concert Series – Verona , Italy – the critics said – “Coburn’s piano playing is characterised by an undoubted technical mastery…[which]…allowed us to experience precious moments of tonal exploration”.
Blessed with a dazzling technique and innate musicianship, and a charismatic performance flair, Lance also broadcasts frequently for radio Deutsche Welle, BBC Radio 3, Lyric fm ( Ireland ) and ABC FM ( Australia ).
He has given master classes for music festivals in Australia, in the Elder Conservatorium in Adelaide and in the Tyalgum Festival in Queensland. In 2006 he presented a lecture recital in Dublin ’s Royal Irish Academy of Music on Carl Vine’s solo piano works, a composer whose works he has a close affinity with.
Lance has also been the recipient of many other first prizes, including the Hephizibah Menuhin Scholarship, the inaugural Lev Vlassenko Piano Competition, and the Australian Young Performers’ Award (Keyboard Section), culminating in a performance of Liszt’s 1st Piano Concerto with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, in the Sydney Opera House, which was also broadcast live across Australia on ABC Television.
Beginning his studies in his homeland of New Zealand, Lance furthered them in Australia, the Tchaikovsky Conservatoire – Moscow and finally with John O’Conor at the Royal Irish Academy of Music.
He enjoys an active freelance career as a solo performer, chamber musician and accompanist. He is also a full-time staff member of the keyboard faculty in the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Lance lives in Dublin with his wife and two children.


 Alex Petcu

Alex Petcu

An Irish musician of Romanian origin, Alex is quickly establishing himself both nationally and internationally as a percussionist of the finest calibre. His recent appearances as a soloist with both RTE orchestras and as the National Concert Hall Rising Star recitalist are some of his main highlights so far. His debut album, “Alex Petcu: In Time” has just been released on the RTE lyric fm label.
Alex enjoys being involved in the creation of new music and so, regularly works with composers. Examples of recent projects include “Beats, Bells and Bridges” and the Abbey Theatre’sproduction of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, both collaborations with composer Tom Lane, “A Most Peculiar Wintry Thing”, a children’s show commissioned by The Ark with music composed by Brian Irvine and “Invitation to a Journey”, a dance/theatre/music collaboration with music by Deirdre Gribbin.
Alex also specialises in solo and chamber music. He regularly performs with the Crash and Hard Rain ensembles, two of Ireland’s main contemporary groups, and is a founding member of the Bangers and Crash Percussion Group, a new exciting percussion ensemble. He has given concerts at the West Cork Chamber Music Festival, Kilruddery House, Killaloe Chamber Music Festival to name a few and has taken part in and had successes in major national and international competitions such as the Irish Freemasons Young Musician of the Year, Tromp and A.R.D.International competitions.
Alex also enjoys performing in an orchestral setting and is a regular extra player for the various professional ensembles in Ireland such as the RTE Symphony, RTE Concert, Irish Chamber, Irish Baroque and Ulster orchestras.
Aside from his performing activities, he is also a keen teacher and has given lecture recitals at Ireland’s universities, taught at the CIT Cork School of Music, given a series of workshops for West Cork Music’s “Tuning Up” outreach scheme and more. He also holds an MA in music performance from the CIT Cork School of Music, an MSc and BSc in Physics from University College Cork.


 Dominic Dudley

Dominic Dudley

Dominic Dudley was born in Dundee, Scotland and started to play the double bass at the age of 13 with Ron Large. He continued his studies at the Guildhall School of Music with Thomas Martin and Kevin Rundell.
After leaving college Dominic quickly became one of England’s leading free-lance double bass players working with the Philharmonia Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta and Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra.
At the age of 24, Dominic was appointed Principal Double Bass of the National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland and since then has become one of Ireland’s leading double bass players, playing regularly with the Vanburgh String Quartet, as well as playing at the West Cork Chamber Music Festival in 1999 and 2000.
Since 1997 Dominic has been Double Bass Teacher at the Royal Irish Academy of Music and he is also a member of the chamber group Prism. He has also become one of the Music Facilitators with the NSOI, which involves taking music workshops before orchestra residences.
Dominic plays on a Double Bass made by George Lott c.1820.