Wednesday 1st May

01-05-2019

Bello Bar
1 Portobello Harbour D8

8:30pm
€12 + booking fee


TICKETS

upcoming event

The penultimate event of the Kaleidoscope series’ 10th season is presented in association with the Irish Jewish Museum. Located on Walworth Rd, the museum, which opened in 1985, is a close neighbour of the Bello Bar and representative of the history of the Portobello area. In the first half of the 20th century, Portobello saw an influx of Jews, refugees from pogroms in Eastern Europe, which gave it the name “Little Jerusalem”. The first Jews fleeing conditions in Lithuania (then part of the Russian Empire) arrived in the early 1870s, settling around Lower Clanbrassil Street. Later the district came to comprise the area from Donore Avenue in the West to Camden Street, with the main shopping area of Little Jerusalem stretched along Lower Clanbrassil Street where many Jewish shops and businesses mixed with local Irish. When the Jewish population of the area had almost disappeared, a Jewish group came together in the 19890s and acquired an apparently ordinary house on Walworth Road. It had, in fact, had been a Jewish residence and contained a synagogue, and has since been used to house artefacts and documents from the Jews of Ireland.
Ticket holders for this Kaleidoscope event will be entitled to a complimentary pass to visit the Irish Jewish Musuem for the week after this event (until May 8th)



Music

Klezmer Song and Instrumentals

Сlarinetist and composer Merlin Shepherd, a uniquely innovative force in the klezmer renaissance, and Polina Shepherd, a virtuosic vocalist, pianist, composer originally from Siberia, blend traditional and newly composed Yiddish and Russian song with klezmer and southern Mediterranean music. Full of passion, depth & subtlety not often encountered in our global village, their style, which has its roots in traditional forms, takes us to new dimensions. Merlin is one of the world’s leading players of traditional East European Klezmer Clarinet style, and apart from his own ensembles he has recorded and played with Boban Marcovic, Fanfara Ciocarlia, Fanfara Savale, Selim Sesler, Budowitz, Frank London’s Klezmer Brass Allstars and numerous others. Polina was born in Siberia and grew up in a Russian Jewish home where songs were regularly sung at table. Growing up in Tatarstan placed her close to Islamic ornamentation and timbre that can be heard in her unique vocal style and four-octave range. Touring with Simkha, the first Klezmer band since Perestroika she sang in dark Soviet theatres, to Boris Yeltsin and to the world.


Nick Roth: Quintet

Nick Roth is a Dublin-based saxophonist, composer, producer and educator whose work is underlined by a limitless sense of exploration and questioning, often of the very science of artistic reality itself. He has been awarded artist-in-residence projects in the European Space Agency (2017), the DLR Lexicon (2017), the California Academy of Sciences (2015) and the Irish Museum of Modern Art (2015). On the occasion of this visit to the Kaleidoscope stage, he will perform in his own 2010 composition- the quintet for bass clarinet (this time on baritone sax) and string quartet. The quintet is written in the form of a theme and variations, where the theme of the work is the Jewish people. Of the work, Roth says “Gradually, although my thoughts during the composition process were initially concerned with telling the story of a specific people during a specific time, it became apparent that, in truth, this constant flight of people through time was in itself merely an analogy for the human race as a whole. All roads lead to Rome….” (NB An excerpt of Roth performing with his band Yurodny)


Salamone Rossi: Sinfonie & Sonatas

Salamone Rossi was an Italian Renaissance composer, of whose life very little is known, although his music is now widely available. The Jews of Renaissance Italy enjoyed intermittent tolerance by various rulers of the autonomous city-states that dotted the northern province. Many achieved prominence as court instrumentalists, singers, dancers, and actors. Rossi (ca.157O-ca.1628) was the last and most distinguished example. In 1587, he began his long association with the Mantuan Court, initially as a singer and violist. He soon became the leader of Duke Vicenzo I’s court musicians and directed an instrumental ensemble probably composed of Jewish musicians. He also became a leading composer, pioneering the musical form known as the trio sonata. Rossi’s great claim to Jewish musical fame came with his publication in 1623 of Ha-Shirim Asher li-Shelomo, a collection of 33 Psalms, hymns, and other liturgical poems set for combinations of from three to eight voices and intended for use on festive synagogue occasions.




Performers

Nick Roth

Nick Roth

Nick Roth is a saxophonist, composer, producer and educator.Nick Roth is a saxophonist, composer, producer and educator.

His work seeks the liberation of improvisation from composition, the poetic syntax of philosophical enquiry, and the function of music as translative epistemology.

A curious predisposition and a steadfast refusal to accept the existence of boundaries between the real and the imaginary has led to collaborations with an array of international performers, composers, choreographers, visual artists, poets, sculptors, directors, festivals and ensembles.

Engaging in conversation with mathematical biologists, astrophysicists, canopy ecologists and hydrologists, his compositions interrogate the inherence of meaning in form, whilst simultaneously subsumed by an insatiable appetite for literature and exploring the symbiotic resonance of language as sound and text.

In 2017 he was artist-in-residence at the European Space Agency (ESTEC) and dlr LexIcon, in 2015 at the California Academy of Sciences and the Irish Museum of Modern Art (IMMA) and in 2014 at the Centre Culturel Irlandais (CCI), Paris

He is artistic director of the Yurodny Ensemble, a founding member of the Water Project, and a partner at Diatribe Records, Ireland’s leading independent record label for new music.

His work is represented by the Contemporary Music Centre and the Association of Irish Composers.


 Polina and Merlin Shephard

Polina and Merlin Shephard

Сlarinetist, composer Merlin Shepherd, a uniquely innovative force in the klezmer renaissance, and Polina Shepherd, a virtuosic vocalist, pianist, composer originally from Siberia blend traditional and newly composed Yiddish and Russian song with klezmer and southern Mediterranean music. Full of passion, depth & subtlety not often encountered in our global village, their style which has its roots in traditional forms takes us to new dimensions.
melrin-polina-portreit
Merlin is one of the world’s leading players of traditional East European Klezmer Clarinet style, and apart from his own ensembles he has recorded and played with Boban Marcovic, Fanfara Ciocarlia, Fanfara Savale, Selim Sesler, Budowitz, Frank London’s Klezmer Brass Allstars and numerous others. www.merlinshepherd.co.uk

Polina was born in Siberia and grew up in a Russian Jewish home where songs were regularly sung at table. Growing up in Tatarstan placed her close to Islamic ornamentation and timbre which can be heard in her unique vocal style and four octave range. Touring with Simkha, the first Klezmer band since Perestroika she sang in dark Soviet theatres, to Boris Yeltsin and to the World. www.polinashepherd.co.uk


 Laoise O’Brien

Laoise O’Brien

Laoise O’Brien is an award winning musician with twenty years professional performance experience. During this time she has managed, produced and delivered multiple performances, tours, festivals & events. Since 2011 she has been active as a music producer, producing first her own albums, and later large-scale projects involving diverse genres and large forces. Laoise’s background is in early music but she is equally at home in classical (both instrumental and vocal), traditional and folk idioms. Her skill-set includes: project management, programming,
score reading, studio supervision, music editing, and art-work management.
Laoise runs a music production company, Jiggery Pokery Productions in collaboration with sound engineer, Ben Rawlins.

As a performer, Laoise is in regular demand and has appeared as a soloist and guest musician with numerous ensembles including the Irish Chamber Orchestra, Irish Baroque Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, Opera Theatre Company, Vanbrugh Quartet, Resurgam, Sestina, The Irish Consort, Camerata Kilkenny, The Gregory Walkers, and is one half of the duo, Temenos with clarinetist, Paul Roe. She has been involved in the design and delivery of programmes for Kilkenny Arts Festival, Galway Early Music Festival, East Cork Early
Music Festival, Killaloe Chamber Music Festival, MusicTown, The Ark Children’s Cultural Centre, Culture Night, LoveLive Music, Music Network, Music Generation, Dublin Institute of Technology, The Heritage Council, and RTÉ.

Laoise is the featured artist of the hugely popular Kaleidoscope Night series for the 2018/2019 season.

Laoise lectures at the DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama, Dublin. She has previously lectured in the CIT Cork School of Music and is regularly invited to examine, adjudicate and deliver workshops in institutes around the country.


 Irish Jewish Museum

Irish Jewish Museum

The penultimate event of the Kaleidoscope series’ 10th season is presented in association with the Irish Jewish Museum. Located on Walworth Rd, the museum, which opened in 1985, is a close neighbour of the Bello Bar and representative of the history of the Portobello area. In the first half of the 20th century, Portobello saw an influx of Jews, refugees from pogroms in Eastern Europe, which gave it the name “Little Jerusalem”. The first Jews fleeing conditions in Lithuania (then part of the Russian Empire) arrived in the early 1870s, settling around Lower Clanbrassil Street. Later the district came to comprise the area from Donore Avenue in the West to Camden Street, with the main shopping area of Little Jerusalem stretched along Lower Clanbrassil Street where many Jewish shops and businesses mixed with local Irish. When the Jewish population of the area had almost disappeared, a Jewish group came together in the 19890s and acquired an apparently ordinary house on Walworth Road. It had, in fact, had been a Jewish residence and contained a synagogue, and has since been used to house artefacts and documents from the Jews of Ireland.